Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015

In Subcommittee on Health – 65 Cosponsors

US Resurgence

Over the past two years, the United States government has slowly backed off its harsh stance against industrial hemp. While, as a nation, we are on the right path, there’s still plenty of work to be done. Helping educate our citizens is one of the purposes of the Hemp Road Trip. In that effort, information on Hemp’s recent resurgence, here in the United States, is outlined below. We ordered it from the present Congress, the 114th, back until the 109th Congress (2005-2006.)

Back then, Representative Ron Paul introduced the Industrial Hemp Farming Act, which only garnered 11 cosponsors. Each successive Congress gained more and more cosponsors, and more legislation regarding hemp. Finally, in 2013, hemp was federally allowed to be cultivated in those states with the proper regulatory system in place. Then, in late 2015, interstate transportation of domestically grown hemp and hemp manufactured products was allowed, expanding the market for hemp farmers nationwide! We have one more hurdle to overcome, that’s to END FEDERAL HEMP PROHIBITION. We believe that can be achieved by passing the INDUSTRIAL HEMP FARMING ACT OF 2015 (see below)! Learn more and help America get #Back2OurRoots.

114th Congress (2015-2016)

One main objective of the Hemp Road Trip’s 2016 Tour is to pass the following pieces of legislation, Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015 (H.R. 525 ∓ S. 134). Passing of these bills would remove hemp from the Controlled Substances Act, and allow for nationwide cultivation, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and distribution of Industrial Hemp. It would help to effectively end federal hemp prohibition and get America #Back2OurRoots.

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015 (H.R. 525) – Rep Thomas Massie (R-KY) Introduced 1/26/15

In Subcommittee on Health – 65 Cosponsors

The language reads as follows:

Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of "marihuana." Defines "industrial hemp" to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis. Deems Cannabis sativa L. to meet that concentration limit if a person grows or processes it for purposes of making industrial hemp in accordance with state law.

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015 (S. 134) – Sen Ron Wyden (D-OR) Introduced 1/08/15

In Committee on Judiciary – 10 Cosponsors

Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of "marihuana." Defines "industrial hemp" to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis. Deems Cannabis sativa L. to meet that concentration limit if a person grows or processes it for purposes of making industrial hemp in accordance with state law, unless the Attorney General determines that the state law is not reasonably calculated to comply with such definition.


The list below is an overview of the legislative efforts from present day back to 2005, when Rep Ron Paul introduced the initial Industrial Hemp Farming Act. As you will see, many of these bills were introduced and put into committee, but never had a hearing or even a committee vote, let alone a full vote by Congress. NOW is the time to focus on pushing forward, no only with committee hearings, but pushing for a full vote of Congress on the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015 (H.R. 525 & S. 134).

In late December 2015, there was some progress allowing access to the domestic hemp industry for American hemp farmers and manufacturers. Rather than continue to allow companies to import industrial hemp and ship it nationwide, while disallowing domestic producers to ship outside their respective states, Congress moved forward with H.R. 2029.

Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2015 (H.R . 2029) – Rep Charles Dent (R-PA) Introduced 12/18/15

BECAME PUBLIC LAW 114-113 on December 18, 2015

Interstate Transport Allowed for Domestically Produced Industrial Hemp

Also known as the Omnibus Bill (of Appropriations Bill) this passed through Congress at the end of 2015, to fund governmental operations. The important section for hemp farmers and entrepreneurs is section 763. It essentially defunded the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) and Department of Justice (DOJ) from prosecuting interstate transport and sale of domestically produced hemp and hemp products. The language reads as follows:

Section 763

None of the funds made available by this Act or any other Act may be used-

(1) in contravention of section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (7 U.S.C. 5940); or

(2) to prohibit the transportation, processing, sale, or use of industrial hemp that is grown or cultivated in accordance with subsection section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014, within or outside the State in which the industrial hemp is grown or cultivated

This Act allows companies and research facilities to transport their products throughout the United States, providing consumers access to domestic products formally only allowed for imports.

113th Congress (2013-2014)

This was the Congress that approved the cultivation, harvesting, processing and distribution of Industrial Hemp for the first time since World War II, when hemp prohibition was lifted as a necessity for war victory. The Republicans, under Representative Frank Lucas of Oklahoma, introduced the Agricultural Act of 2014, in which, Section 7606, allowed for domestic hemp again in those States that had a regulatory infrastructure. In 2015, the following States approved the growing of Industrial Hemp: Colorado, Kentucky, Indiana, Vermont, Hawaii, Tennessee, North Dakota, Washington & North Carolina.

Agricultural Act of 2014 (H.R 2642) – Rep Frank Lucas (R-OK) Introduced 7/10/13

BECAME PUBLIC LAW 113-79 on February 7, 2014

This was a lengthy bill with many sections, the most important to our domestic hemp industry was section 7606 (language below). This section allowed for the first domestic planting and cultivation of Industrial Hemp, for purposes of research in those states in which an agricultural or academic research program was established. Language of the law states:

(Sec. 7606) Authorizes an institution of higher education or a state department of agriculture to cultivate industrial hemp if:

• cultivated for purposes of research under an agricultural pilot program or other agricultural or academic research, and

• allowed under the laws of the state in which the institution or department is located and the research occurs.

The following Amendments were approved relating to the above Public Law 113-79

House Amendment 208 – Rep Jared Polis (R-CO)

PASSED by vote of 225-200 (6/20/13)

Amendment allows institutions of higher education to grow or cultivate industrial hemp for the purpose of agricultural or academic research. Amendment applies only to states that already permit industrial hemp growth and cultivation under state law.

House Amendment 754 – Rep Thomas Massie (R-KY)

PASSED by vote of 246-162 (5/30/14)

An amendment to prohibit the use of funds in contravention of section 7606 ("Legitimacy of Industrial Hemp Research") of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (Public Law No. 113-79) by the Department of Justice or the Drug Enforcement Administration.

House Amendment 745 – Rep Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR)

PASSED by vote of 237-170 (5/30/14)

An amendment to prohibit the use of funds to prevent a State from implementing its own State laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession, or cultivation of industrial hemp, as defined in section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (Public Law 113-79).

Additional legislation was introduced, but without vote and ineffective in the 113th Congress.

Charlotte’s Web Medical Hemp Act of 2014 (H.R. 5226) – Rep Scott Perry (R-PA) Introduced 7/28/14

No vote - 38 Cosponsors

Died in Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations. Language reads as follows:

Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude therapeutic hemp and cannabidiol: (1) from the definition of "marihuana," and (2) from treatment as a controlled substance under such Act. Defines: (1) "therapeutic hemp" to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant with a delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis; and (2) "cannabidiol" to mean the substance cannabidiol, as derived from therapeutic hemp.

Exempts therapeutic hemp or cannabidiol from the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.

Declares that nothing in this Act shall restrict any activities related to the use, production, or distribution of marihuana in a state in which such activities are legal under state law.

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 (S. 359) – Sen Ron Wyden (D-OR) Introduced 2/14/13

No vote

Total of 5 Cosponsors, language reads as follows:

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 - Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of "marihuana." Defines "industrial hemp" to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis. Deems Cannabis sativa L. to meet that concentration limit if a person grows or processes it for purposes of making industrial hemp in accordance with state law, unless the Attorney General determines that the state law is not reasonably calculated to comply with such definition.

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 (H.R. 525) – Rep Thomas Massie (R-KY) Introduced 2/06/13 N

No vote

Total of 50 Cosponsors, language reads as follows:

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 - Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of "marihuana." Defines "industrial hemp" to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis. Deems Cannabis sativa L. to meet that concentration limit if a person grows or processes it for purposes of making industrial hemp in accordance with state law.

112th Congress (2011-2012)

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2011 (H.R. 1831) – Rep Ron Paul (R-TX)

No Vote – 37 Cosponsors

In another bold attempt at passing reasonable hemp legislation, Representative Ron Paul (R-TX) introduced the above act. This time there were 37 Cosponsors in the House. Again, dies without a vote in House Subcommittee.

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2012 (S. 3501) – Sen Ron Wyden (D-OR)

No Vote - 3 Senator Cosponsors

For the first time in years, the Senate also introduced hemp legislation! Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) was able to gather 3 Senator cosponsors, read the bill twice on the floor, and finally referred the legislation to the Senate Judiciary Committee. The bill did not receive a vote and died in committee.

The language reads as follows:

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2012 - Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of "marihuana." Defines "industrial hemp" to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant, whether growing or not, with a delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol concentration of not more than 0.3 percent on a dry weight basis. Deems Cannabis sativa L. to meet that concentration limit if a person grows or processes it for purposes of making industrial hemp in accordance with state law.

111th Congress (2009-2010)

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2009 (H.R. 1866) – Rep Ron Paul (R-TX)

No Vote – 25 Cosponsors

Once again, Representative Ron Paul (R-TX) introduced this legislation, which this Congress gained 25 cosponsors. It again did not go to vote and, after being introduced to a variety of Subcommittees, died in the House Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security. No vote and no further action. But the number of cosponsors doubled from the prior year’s Congress!

110th Congress (2007-2008)

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2007 (H.R. 1009) – Rep Ron Paul (R-TX)

No Vote – 13 Cosponsors

Another bill introduced by Representative Ron Paul (R-TX), gained 13 cosponsors and was finally referred to the House Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism and Homeland Security, after being introduced in a variety of other Subcomittees. There was no vote and no further action was taken. The language of this bill states:

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2007 - Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of "marihuana." Defines "industrial hemp" to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant with a delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol concentration that does not exceed .3 percent on a dry weight basis. Grants a state regulating the growing and processing of industrial hemp exclusive authority, in any criminal or civil action or administrative proceeding, to determine whether any such plant meets that concentration limit.

109th Congress (2005-2006)

Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2005 (H.R. 3037) – Rep Ron Paul

No Vote – 11 Cosponsors

This bill was introduced by Representative Ron Paul (R-TX), and gained 11 Cosponsors. It was referred to various House subcommittees, but no further action was taken. No vote on the bill. The language of this bill states:

Amends the Controlled Substances Act to exclude industrial hemp from the definition of "marihuana." Defines "industrial hemp" to mean the plant Cannabis sativa L. and any part of such plant with a delta-nine tetrahydrocannabinol concentration that does not exceed .3 percent on a dry weight basis. Grants a state regulating the growing and processing of industrial hemp exclusive authority, in any criminal or civil action or administrative proceeding, to determine whether any such plant meets that concentration limit.

PDF found here